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Clostridium perfringens Type C

7151

12/30/01

Etiology and symptoms

Types C and D are easily confused and many of the terms used to describe them are used interchangeably. It is also called enteritis, dysentery, enterotoxemia or "struck." In sheep, Type C is mostly seen in the young with a fetid, blood-tinged diarrhea or early death without signs. In goats, it is more likely to attack adults and is known as "goat enterotoxemia." There may be a complete absence of symptoms preceding death. The "nervous signs" of Type D are usually lacking.
Treatment
Type C and D antitoxin is readily available and is about the only effective treatment.
Prevention
The disease is easily prevented in the young by vaccinating pregnant dams (with CD/T or 7way, see Routine section) about three weeks prior to delivery and subsequent vaccination of offspring. Two vaccinations, 3 - 4 weeks apart, are required initially. Some sources recommend vaccinating adult does every 6 months.


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